Drupal Spam Blocking

I've been running this blog on Drupal for a while now, and am generally quite happy with it. The one thing I'd been missing from my days powered by WordPress was a transparent and effective spam blocker. I was so totally spoiled by Spam Karma 2 that everything else just seems like a kid's toy in comparison.

I'd installed the Spam module shortly after I switched to Drupal, but it never seemed to actually block spam. It is pretty handy at removing it, but the URL and keyword matches didn't seem to actually stop spam.

Then, this morning, some spamass decided it would be fun to point his (I'm assuming this jerk is a guy) spambots at my blog. The spam was consistently getting past Spam.module, but it was pretty easy to clean up after the jerk. Still, it's no fun playing mop-up after a cretinous script kiddie, so I rolled up my sleeves to see if I could duct tape a better solution together.

Thankfully, the work had already been done for me, just not updated to Drupal 4.7. The Spam.module for 4.6 ships with a Spam URI Realtime Blocklist module, which will check incoming comments with 6 different realtime-updated shared lists of known spammers.

So, I fired up the Form Updater module, converted the spam_surbl.module code to 4.7, and deployed it. It seems to work so far – of course I'm jynxing it now… I've attached my hack update of spam_surbl.module, which I'm using on Drupal 4.7 here. I'll send a copy to the developer of Spam.module in case he wants to include an updated blocklist module (I didn't convert the .mysql file to an .install autoinstaller, so you may need to run that manually to get the module ready).

I've been running this blog on Drupal for a while now, and am generally quite happy with it. The one thing I'd been missing from my days powered by WordPress was a transparent and effective spam blocker. I was so totally spoiled by Spam Karma 2 that everything else just seems like a kid's toy in comparison.

I'd installed the Spam module shortly after I switched to Drupal, but it never seemed to actually block spam. It is pretty handy at removing it, but the URL and keyword matches didn't seem to actually stop spam.

Then, this morning, some spamass decided it would be fun to point his (I'm assuming this jerk is a guy) spambots at my blog. The spam was consistently getting past Spam.module, but it was pretty easy to clean up after the jerk. Still, it's no fun playing mop-up after a cretinous script kiddie, so I rolled up my sleeves to see if I could duct tape a better solution together.

Thankfully, the work had already been done for me, just not updated to Drupal 4.7. The Spam.module for 4.6 ships with a Spam URI Realtime Blocklist module, which will check incoming comments with 6 different realtime-updated shared lists of known spammers.

So, I fired up the Form Updater module, converted the spam_surbl.module code to 4.7, and deployed it. It seems to work so far – of course I'm jynxing it now… I've attached my hack update of spam_surbl.module, which I'm using on Drupal 4.7 here. I'll send a copy to the developer of Spam.module in case he wants to include an updated blocklist module (I didn't convert the .mysql file to an .install autoinstaller, so you may need to run that manually to get the module ready).

15 thoughts on “Drupal Spam Blocking”

  1. I’m considering switching from WP to Drupal, and I am concerned about spam as well. So, would you say that the BB + Akismet is about as good as Spam Karma 2 on WP? Thanks!

  2. I wouldn’t say it’s quite as good as Spam Karma 2 on WP – I’ve never seen anything work quite that well – but it’s pretty darned close. Spam is basically a non-issue. I’ve switched to BB + Spam.module because I didn’t like being at the mercy of an external service. It’s been 99+ % bulletproof (er, resistant?) so far.

  3. I think there is a piece of code at aspdotnetatoms.com that you can attach into the site to stop the spam.

    1. True. It will also cut down on a whole bunch of valid comments, either through operator error (forgetting to go ahead and click “publish comment” after previewing it) or by turning people away by raising the threshold for participation. Anything that causes friction to the process of having a conversation sucks a bit of soul out of the conversation. Not worth it.

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