more Papers love

I’ve been slowly working on my MSc research proposal. Still **far** to early to post any of it online, but it’s starting to take shape. I’m using [Papers](http://mekentosj.com/papers/) to gather journal articles for reference as I’m working. Today, I added 33 articles to the stack, on top of the 63 I’ve already gathered. That’s not manageable. But Papers has some great tools to help cut through stuff quickly. I can sort the articles by the number of citations they have, which pushes “important” articles up to the top of the list. Then I can work through them all more effectively, without worrying about missing anything important.

Of course, Papers is also to blame for the tall stack of papers to read. It makes it almost **too easy** to find articles.

A giant list of 96 papers with 33 new additions becomes a filtered list of 31 papers to read first, sorted by “importance”. Now, if I had an iPad to read the papers without being tethered to a computer (or killing a forest of trees, and draining several unicorns of their blood for inkjet printer cartridges…)

Papers_sorted.png

Best academic-use-of-wikipedia quote. EVAR!

Brian 's finally getting back to blogging, after being dragged to the other side of the planet and back. He knocks one out of the park with this one.

So I too use Wikipedia as a nexus for discussing all manner of digital effects. Sure, you have to acknowledge some shortcomings, but I'll stack the benefits against the liabilities any day. And when, as is almost inevitable, someone asks "what do you think of students citing Wikipedia in an academic essay?" I simply shout back "what do you think of someone citing Britannica? Huh? HUH?" and glare at them a bit. That usually shuts them up, and shutting people up is the hallmark of authoritative instruction.

No kidding. People seem to forget that just because something's online doesn't make it authoritative, trusted, nor appropriate for citation. Just the same as offline publications. You likely wouldn't cite People Magazine in an academic paper (unless, maybe, the paper was on the history of pop culture or something…)

Nor should you cite Wikipedia (or Brittanica, or Readers' Digest) as a primary source.

ps. welcome back, Brian! And with a healthy dose of “blamb’s ways to enrich your vocabulary” – using “synecdoche” casually in a post. I had to look that sucker up.

Brian 's finally getting back to blogging, after being dragged to the other side of the planet and back. He knocks one out of the park with this one.

So I too use Wikipedia as a nexus for discussing all manner of digital effects. Sure, you have to acknowledge some shortcomings, but I'll stack the benefits against the liabilities any day. And when, as is almost inevitable, someone asks "what do you think of students citing Wikipedia in an academic essay?" I simply shout back "what do you think of someone citing Britannica? Huh? HUH?" and glare at them a bit. That usually shuts them up, and shutting people up is the hallmark of authoritative instruction.

No kidding. People seem to forget that just because something's online doesn't make it authoritative, trusted, nor appropriate for citation. Just the same as offline publications. You likely wouldn't cite People Magazine in an academic paper (unless, maybe, the paper was on the history of pop culture or something…)

Nor should you cite Wikipedia (or Brittanica, or Readers' Digest) as a primary source.

ps. welcome back, Brian! And with a healthy dose of “blamb’s ways to enrich your vocabulary” – using “synecdoche” casually in a post. I had to look that sucker up.

Pedagogical applications of Drupal

Alan forwarded me a link to this really great presentation by Tim Lindgren at Boston College, documenting some pedagogical and instructional design applications of Drupal. I'm sure much of it would translate to other software platforms, but there are some detailed descriptions and case studies written specifically from the point of view of implementing this in Drupal.

Thanks Alan! And thanks to Tim for putting this together!

Alan forwarded me a link to this really great presentation by Tim Lindgren at Boston College, documenting some pedagogical and instructional design applications of Drupal. I'm sure much of it would translate to other software platforms, but there are some detailed descriptions and case studies written specifically from the point of view of implementing this in Drupal.

Thanks Alan! And thanks to Tim for putting this together!