Ghostery – protecting your privacy online

I’ve been using the Ghostery extension in both Chrome and Safari for awhile now. It sniffs the web pages and blocks requests for the douchey stuff that tries to track you online. It lets the good stuff through, but prevents all of the creepiness from executing. It also reports on how many tracking items are attempting to worm their way through it on each page you visit. Eye opening.

It’s free. Runs in Chrome, Safari, Firefox, and IE. There’s also a custom browser for use on iOS, but I haven’t tried it yet.

For instance, on my blog, it shows that the embedded twitter code I pasted on a previous post triggers some tracking funkiness. It blocks it automatically. And it also shows that there aren’t any analytics or other trackers running here.

It’s a small thing, but makes the web feel like more of an opt-in exercise, rather than an uncomfortable walk through a street lined with scammers etc…

Flock pre-Cardinal Update

I’m playing with a pre-Cardinal (the next Big Release) build of Flock, and man is it nice! They’ve replaced the blog editor, and it’s the best blog editor I’ve used. Very nice. The blog manager topbar appears to have disappeared, but I assume it’s just being tweaked and will return before the Big Release.

My only gripe is that category selection still sucks – no way to easily find one of my 331 categories in a list sorted by primary key of the category database record. Some sorting/searching/filtering/text-auto-complete interface would be waaay more effective. Oh, and the selected category didn’t get applied anyway. I’ll go in through the Wordpress web UI to fix it…

The Flickr interface is great, too. Uploading stuff, browsing people and tags. I’m really looking forward to using the native del.icio.us bookmark manager as well – the web-based one used by the Firefox extension is so slow it’s actually painful to use. Cocoalicious works great, but needs to be installed and running in order to be faster than the FF extension…

Update: Wow. This build of Flock has a cool add-on, where it recognizes any image hosted by Flickr, and adds a contextual link to let you easily browse that person’s photostream. Something you could do otherwise, but it takes 2 clicks, and goes through Flickr’s site. The Flock feature uses their cool photostream UI instead. Very cool.

I’m playing with a pre-Cardinal (the next Big Release) build of Flock, and man is it nice! They’ve replaced the blog editor, and it’s the best blog editor I’ve used. Very nice. The blog manager topbar appears to have disappeared, but I assume it’s just being tweaked and will return before the Big Release.

My only gripe is that category selection still sucks – no way to easily find one of my 331 categories in a list sorted by primary key of the category database record. Some sorting/searching/filtering/text-auto-complete interface would be waaay more effective. Oh, and the selected category didn’t get applied anyway. I’ll go in through the WordPress web UI to fix it…

The Flickr interface is great, too. Uploading stuff, browsing people and tags. I’m really looking forward to using the native del.icio.us bookmark manager as well – the web-based one used by the Firefox extension is so slow it’s actually painful to use. Cocoalicious works great, but needs to be installed and running in order to be faster than the FF extension…

Update: Wow. This build of Flock has a cool add-on, where it recognizes any image hosted by Flickr, and adds a contextual link to let you easily browse that person’s photostream. Something you could do otherwise, but it takes 2 clicks, and goes through Flickr’s site. The Flock feature uses their cool photostream UI instead. Very cool.

Browsing with Lynx

I’m trying to quickly check in from home, but the browser on my home machine is acting up and refusing to access websites. I guess that’s forgivable – I’m still running my (otherwise) trusty old PowerMacintosh 8600/300 running MacOS 9.1. Before you laugh, this bad boy was literally the fastest personal computer in Calgary for a few weeks when I got it, and I paid more for this system than many people pay for cars.

Regardless, my browser (the latest Mozilla 1.3.1 build for antique Macs) is acting up. How to access the web? I have 2 options.

  1. Take over my desktop on campus via VNC. This works, but is dog slow.
  2. Log into one of our servers via SSH and fire up Lynx. Works like a charm. Browsing is refreshingly fast without images, javascript, and ads…

I’ve been pleasantly surprised at just how usable many websites are. Blogs seem to be faring even better – kudos to the various blog theme developers. It’s important to remember that 2 critical sets of users see the web through the eyes of a text-only browser.

  1. Visually impaired readers
  2. Search engines.

Yes. Google is essentially a visually impaired reader. I personally think everyone should periodically try their sites in a text-only browser to see how these two very important groups of users see things.

I’m trying to quickly check in from home, but the browser on my home machine is acting up and refusing to access websites. I guess that’s forgivable – I’m still running my (otherwise) trusty old PowerMacintosh 8600/300 running MacOS 9.1. Before you laugh, this bad boy was literally the fastest personal computer in Calgary for a few weeks when I got it, and I paid more for this system than many people pay for cars.

Regardless, my browser (the latest Mozilla 1.3.1 build for antique Macs) is acting up. How to access the web? I have 2 options.

  1. Take over my desktop on campus via VNC. This works, but is dog slow.
  2. Log into one of our servers via SSH and fire up Lynx. Works like a charm. Browsing is refreshingly fast without images, javascript, and ads…

I’ve been pleasantly surprised at just how usable many websites are. Blogs seem to be faring even better – kudos to the various blog theme developers. It’s important to remember that 2 critical sets of users see the web through the eyes of a text-only browser.

  1. Visually impaired readers
  2. Search engines.

Yes. Google is essentially a visually impaired reader. I personally think everyone should periodically try their sites in a text-only browser to see how these two very important groups of users see things.

Thoughts after trying Firefox again

When I upgraded my blog to WordPress 2.0 RC3 last week, there was a bug or issue that corrupted a cookie used by the fancy schmancy new authoring screens. Safari barfed all over that corrupt cookie, meaning I couldn’t use it to manage my blog. Firefox just ignored it (and the functionality that required that cookie apparently degraded transparently – the widgets were no longer collapsable or movable).

So, I thought it would be a good chance to switch to Firefox 1.5 for a while and kick the tires a bit as my primary (only) browser.

Things I like about Firefox:

  • Fancy schmancy wysiwyg and “ajax” crap all just works.
  • Websites don’t try to protect me from myself by warning me that I’m using Safari
  • The del.icio.us extension makes creating bookmarks better (but not hugely better than the bookmarklet)
  • The great “Web Developer” sidebar, with the cool stuff like cookie inspectors. Many of these tools are reproducable via bookmarklets, but it’s nice to have a unified place to get them all.

Things I don’t like so much:

  • NO. SPEL. CHEKER. I tried installing the recommended extension, but it never worked. And wouldn’t have been integrated with the OS-level dictionary I use in every other app on my Powerbook. It’s really uncomfortable typing away, and not being able to know at a glance, or via peripheral vision, if I’d made a typo or a stupid spelling attempt (I rarely get words with more than 3 letters right on the first shot…)
  • No Cocoa UI widgets – they’re available in Camino, and are apparently planned for Firefox 3.0 (official plan), but the XUL widgets suck badly, compared to the great ones that are provided by Cocoa. Apparently, I’m not the only one who feels this way.
  • Feels like it is quite a bit slower than Safari. Speed is good.
  • Text rendering sucks badly as well. Compare pages to what they look like in Safari. Just simply not as good. And Firefox doesn’t support the CSS dropshadow – meaning my blog’s banner text looks worse in Firefox 😉
  • Page load progress indicator – the simple spinning “working…” indicator just ain’t enough. There’s an extension to get more info, including a progress thermometer, but nothing comes close to Safari’s elegant thermometer-beneath-the-location-field implementation.

When I upgraded my blog to WordPress 2.0 RC3 last week, there was a bug or issue that corrupted a cookie used by the fancy schmancy new authoring screens. Safari barfed all over that corrupt cookie, meaning I couldn’t use it to manage my blog. Firefox just ignored it (and the functionality that required that cookie apparently degraded transparently – the widgets were no longer collapsable or movable).

So, I thought it would be a good chance to switch to Firefox 1.5 for a while and kick the tires a bit as my primary (only) browser.

Things I like about Firefox:

  • Fancy schmancy wysiwyg and “ajax” crap all just works.
  • Websites don’t try to protect me from myself by warning me that I’m using Safari
  • The del.icio.us extension makes creating bookmarks better (but not hugely better than the bookmarklet)
  • The great “Web Developer” sidebar, with the cool stuff like cookie inspectors. Many of these tools are reproducable via bookmarklets, but it’s nice to have a unified place to get them all.

Things I don’t like so much:

  • NO. SPEL. CHEKER. I tried installing the recommended extension, but it never worked. And wouldn’t have been integrated with the OS-level dictionary I use in every other app on my Powerbook. It’s really uncomfortable typing away, and not being able to know at a glance, or via peripheral vision, if I’d made a typo or a stupid spelling attempt (I rarely get words with more than 3 letters right on the first shot…)
  • No Cocoa UI widgets – they’re available in Camino, and are apparently planned for Firefox 3.0 (official plan), but the XUL widgets suck badly, compared to the great ones that are provided by Cocoa. Apparently, I’m not the only one who feels this way.
  • Feels like it is quite a bit slower than Safari. Speed is good.
  • Text rendering sucks badly as well. Compare pages to what they look like in Safari. Just simply not as good. And Firefox doesn’t support the CSS dropshadow – meaning my blog’s banner text looks worse in Firefox 😉
  • Page load progress indicator – the simple spinning “working…” indicator just ain’t enough. There’s an extension to get more info, including a progress thermometer, but nothing comes close to Safari’s elegant thermometer-beneath-the-location-field implementation.

Performancing Weblog Editor for Firefox

The “Performancing” folks just released a plugin for Firefox that provides a fully featured weblog editor, ala Flock. I’m trying it out now – it appears to talk to WordPress OK (well, if this made it to the blog, that is).

It appears to have a decent WYSIWYG editor, but the image embedding doodad doesn’t seem to have an upload utility – so I think you have to manually upload an image and then paste the URL into the image widget. Not fatal, but an “easy” improvement to the plugin. (I know, “easy” is oversimplifying it, since the plugin is aimed at being platform agnostic, so you’d have to have special cases for WP, MT, Blogger, etc…)

Update: Well, let’s see… the HTML it produces sucks badly. Editing a post appears to create a duplicate post (leaving the unedited original, and creating a new one with the edited version). Don’t think I’ll be using this one much…

Update 2: I was a little hard on the Performancing Firefox extension out of the gate. I wasn’t happy with the WYSIWYG HTML, but switching to “raw code” mode gives me essentially the stock WordPress text editor, which is what I’m used to. Also, I must have missed the “Publish as Edit” button – which is displayed right next to the “Publish to:” button – I don’t see how I could have missed that big button. Anyway, if this post was edited, then it works fine 🙂

Yup. that worked. OK, so now I see it as one step more advanced than the stock WP bookmarklets – since it gives you access to the post history so you can easily edit older posts. But, in WordPress, once you’ve been logged on, all posts anywhere you see them on your blog have an “edit” link, so it’s so easy to edit older posts anyway…

The “Performancing” folks just released a plugin for Firefox that provides a fully featured weblog editor, ala Flock. I’m trying it out now – it appears to talk to WordPress OK (well, if this made it to the blog, that is).

It appears to have a decent WYSIWYG editor, but the image embedding doodad doesn’t seem to have an upload utility – so I think you have to manually upload an image and then paste the URL into the image widget. Not fatal, but an “easy” improvement to the plugin. (I know, “easy” is oversimplifying it, since the plugin is aimed at being platform agnostic, so you’d have to have special cases for WP, MT, Blogger, etc…)

Update: Well, let’s see… the HTML it produces sucks badly. Editing a post appears to create a duplicate post (leaving the unedited original, and creating a new one with the edited version). Don’t think I’ll be using this one much…

Update 2: I was a little hard on the Performancing Firefox extension out of the gate. I wasn’t happy with the WYSIWYG HTML, but switching to “raw code” mode gives me essentially the stock WordPress text editor, which is what I’m used to. Also, I must have missed the “Publish as Edit” button – which is displayed right next to the “Publish to:” button – I don’t see how I could have missed that big button. Anyway, if this post was edited, then it works fine 🙂

Yup. that worked. OK, so now I see it as one step more advanced than the stock WP bookmarklets – since it gives you access to the post history so you can easily edit older posts. But, in WordPress, once you’ve been logged on, all posts anywhere you see them on your blog have an “edit” link, so it’s so easy to edit older posts anyway…

A few days with OmniWeb 5.1.2

I’m really digging OmniWeb. It’s got lots of cool stuff that work as I would expect them to, not as if they were ported from some other source. It behaves as a great MacOSX app should.

Over the weekend, I was writing up a blog post, and when I got to about 75% done, I opened a new tab to get a link. OmniWeb crashed. Crap! OmniCrashCatcher pops up, and I filed what would perhaps be described as a more-colourful-than-necessary bug report. The next morning, however, I fired up OmniWeb again, and all of the tabs that I had opened were restored for me – and, get this – the contents of the WordPress blog post entry form were also resurrected for me, right at the point OmniWeb had crashed! I didn’t lose a thing! That’s just plain awesome. It never occurred to me to even check to see if the form values would be resurrected after a crash, so I assumed the post was gone. Of course, it wasn’t Shakespeare or anything, but still – that’s just cool.

On top of that, the “live” source editor rocks quite nicely, and the “Get Info” pane for any page is the best I’ve seen. (it would be even better if it allowed you to get the full URL for every resource, but that’s so minor)

So far, the OmniWeb experience has rocked. No plans to switch off of it as a default browser. But, there are a few little niggles that keep me launching Safari occasionally.

  • The “AJAX” stuff in Flickr doesn’t seem to like OmniWeb. I’d thought maybe the ad-blocking stuff was borking it, so turned it off. No joy. Can’t add photos as favorites. Can’t edit titles/descriptions of photos. Can’t even open Organizer for some reason… Have to launch Safari for that – which is odd, since they’re both based on WebKit – perhaps OmniWeb’s embedded WebKit is a bit off?
  • Some sites just don’t want to display in it. No idea if it’s a weird browser-sniffing thing going on or not, but I’ve had to launch Safari a couple of times to view things.
  • CSS display seems to be a bit off – things like the Flickr photos section of my blog display weirdly – and there are other sites that don’t behave as they do in Safari.

But, those are relatively minor nits to pick. Hopefully easy fixes (either in configuration on my end, or in code at OmniGroup). I’m just glad I’m putting my OmniWeb license to use again 🙂

Update: Oh, yeah. Just realized that one of my machines has to run OmniWeb in “unlicensed mode” since the licensing system checks the LAN for other copies using the same serial number. That means I’d get to buy a license for every machine that I want to run OmniWeb on – not cool. I paid for the OW license, but I’d have to shell out another $29US for each machine I want to use it on. I could see a token fee – $5 or $10 per additional machine – but not a whole ‘nother license…

Update: I also find that I really miss Safari’s page-load-status-as-thermometer-in-Location-bar style of loading indicator. Makes it much easier to see status in my peripheral vision – in OW, I have to seek out the rotating “loading” widget, then click on it to see how much of the page is left to load. Much less elegant.

I’m really digging OmniWeb. It’s got lots of cool stuff that work as I would expect them to, not as if they were ported from some other source. It behaves as a great MacOSX app should.

Over the weekend, I was writing up a blog post, and when I got to about 75% done, I opened a new tab to get a link. OmniWeb crashed. Crap! OmniCrashCatcher pops up, and I filed what would perhaps be described as a more-colourful-than-necessary bug report. The next morning, however, I fired up OmniWeb again, and all of the tabs that I had opened were restored for me – and, get this – the contents of the WordPress blog post entry form were also resurrected for me, right at the point OmniWeb had crashed! I didn’t lose a thing! That’s just plain awesome. It never occurred to me to even check to see if the form values would be resurrected after a crash, so I assumed the post was gone. Of course, it wasn’t Shakespeare or anything, but still – that’s just cool.

On top of that, the “live” source editor rocks quite nicely, and the “Get Info” pane for any page is the best I’ve seen. (it would be even better if it allowed you to get the full URL for every resource, but that’s so minor)

So far, the OmniWeb experience has rocked. No plans to switch off of it as a default browser. But, there are a few little niggles that keep me launching Safari occasionally.

  • The “AJAX” stuff in Flickr doesn’t seem to like OmniWeb. I’d thought maybe the ad-blocking stuff was borking it, so turned it off. No joy. Can’t add photos as favorites. Can’t edit titles/descriptions of photos. Can’t even open Organizer for some reason… Have to launch Safari for that – which is odd, since they’re both based on WebKit – perhaps OmniWeb’s embedded WebKit is a bit off?
  • Some sites just don’t want to display in it. No idea if it’s a weird browser-sniffing thing going on or not, but I’ve had to launch Safari a couple of times to view things.
  • CSS display seems to be a bit off – things like the Flickr photos section of my blog display weirdly – and there are other sites that don’t behave as they do in Safari.

But, those are relatively minor nits to pick. Hopefully easy fixes (either in configuration on my end, or in code at OmniGroup). I’m just glad I’m putting my OmniWeb license to use again 🙂

Update: Oh, yeah. Just realized that one of my machines has to run OmniWeb in “unlicensed mode” since the licensing system checks the LAN for other copies using the same serial number. That means I’d get to buy a license for every machine that I want to run OmniWeb on – not cool. I paid for the OW license, but I’d have to shell out another $29US for each machine I want to use it on. I could see a token fee – $5 or $10 per additional machine – but not a whole ‘nother license…

Update: I also find that I really miss Safari’s page-load-status-as-thermometer-in-Location-bar style of loading indicator. Makes it much easier to see status in my peripheral vision – in OW, I have to seek out the rotating “loading” widget, then click on it to see how much of the page is left to load. Much less elegant.

Browsers (again)

I’ve been playing with different browsers for the last couple of weeks (Safari, Flock, Firefox, Mozilla, Opera, iCab), and kept coming back to Safari because it just plain “feels” right. The other apps feel ported, in some parts poorly. Then, Les Orchard reminded me of OmniWeb. I’ve always loved OmniWeb, but the rendering engine was lacking in older versions, and the recent version switched to a custom WebKit framework which works quite well.

OmniWeb 5 has a lot of really nice features. The tab implementation is simply second to none. The app behaves as a first-class citizen on MacOSX. It’s got some handy stuff like a tearable textarea widget (so you can hit a button and the textarea box becomes its own window, with resize controls, and export/import functions). The source view rocks, too (with live editing as well), and it’s got a decent built-in adblocker.

And, it also offers bookmark syncing via WebDav! (note: U of C webdav info) I’m going to give it a shot as a default browser for awhile…

Here’s a screenshot of the textarea widget from the WordPress post entry screen, with the “torn off” windowed version as well:
OmniWeb textarea widget

I’ve been playing with different browsers for the last couple of weeks (Safari, Flock, Firefox, Mozilla, Opera, iCab), and kept coming back to Safari because it just plain “feels” right. The other apps feel ported, in some parts poorly. Then, Les Orchard reminded me of OmniWeb. I’ve always loved OmniWeb, but the rendering engine was lacking in older versions, and the recent version switched to a custom WebKit framework which works quite well.

OmniWeb 5 has a lot of really nice features. The tab implementation is simply second to none. The app behaves as a first-class citizen on MacOSX. It’s got some handy stuff like a tearable textarea widget (so you can hit a button and the textarea box becomes its own window, with resize controls, and export/import functions). The source view rocks, too (with live editing as well), and it’s got a decent built-in adblocker.

And, it also offers bookmark syncing via WebDav! (note: U of C webdav info) I’m going to give it a shot as a default browser for awhile…

Here’s a screenshot of the textarea widget from the WordPress post entry screen, with the “torn off” windowed version as well:
OmniWeb textarea widget

Reverting to Safari for default browser

I tried. I really tried to use Firefox as my default browser. I was kind of enjoying it, but kept finding myself tripping over stuff like a UI that doesn’t respond the way a native MacOSX app should, and a browser that was rather prone to locking up (although pages rendered quickly). Key commands that were quirky and decidedly non-Macish. Mouse buttons didn’t respond as expected (even my multibutton mouse with scrollwheel behaved more reliably under Safari than Firefox).

It felt like Firefox would be just as comfortable running on an X11 server as on my Mac – but that glosses over the nicenesses of the Mac UI. It just got to be too much. I think the only thing I’ll really miss (although that might be stretching it a little) is the WYSIWYG editor support. If I ever really need that, then Firefox is a short command+space Firefox away…

Also, I realized that Safari (with Stand and a few bookmarklets installed) offers about the same functionality in a nice, fast, clean app. I’ll keep Firefox around for testing and debugging stuff, but will be using Safari as my default browser. Or, perhaps, a recent beta of OmniWeb… Damned novelty addiction!

I tried. I really tried to use Firefox as my default browser. I was kind of enjoying it, but kept finding myself tripping over stuff like a UI that doesn’t respond the way a native MacOSX app should, and a browser that was rather prone to locking up (although pages rendered quickly). Key commands that were quirky and decidedly non-Macish. Mouse buttons didn’t respond as expected (even my multibutton mouse with scrollwheel behaved more reliably under Safari than Firefox).

It felt like Firefox would be just as comfortable running on an X11 server as on my Mac – but that glosses over the nicenesses of the Mac UI. It just got to be too much. I think the only thing I’ll really miss (although that might be stretching it a little) is the WYSIWYG editor support. If I ever really need that, then Firefox is a short command+space Firefox away…

Also, I realized that Safari (with Stand and a few bookmarklets installed) offers about the same functionality in a nice, fast, clean app. I’ll keep Firefox around for testing and debugging stuff, but will be using Safari as my default browser. Or, perhaps, a recent beta of OmniWeb… Damned novelty addiction!

Thoughts on Flock

My first reaction to Flock was “holy crap!” – after using it for awhile, I’m still very impressed, but also a little surprised. I’d thought that the tighter integration to my blog, del.icio.us and Flickr accounts would have totally changed the way I worked with those tools. I suppose there is still the potential for that, but there isn’t really anything that I couldn’t replicate in other browsers using some decent bookmarklets. My del.icio.us account is already one click away on any browser I use (for adding, querying and viewing), as is my blog (again, for all CRUD tasks), Flickr, and lots of other handy tools. And my current blog posting utility (using the popup window in any browser) doesn’t give me the crappy-HTML-code-generation problems, or disappearing-post problems that Flock’s built in editor appears to suffer from.

After stepping back a bit, I realized that part of what was impressing me so much about Flock was the Firefox core beneath the custom code. The extensions I’d added are pretty sweet (GreaseMonkey, the Web Developer Toolbar, etc…) and already available for Firefox. And “stock” Firefox doesn’t have some of the perceived performance problems I’m having with Flock (some of which are, I’m sure, due to the synchronization with del.icio.us).

So, after saying I’d give Flock some time to try it out, I waffle on that, and am moving straight to Firefox for a week or so. I’ll be keeping my eye on Flock though – it’s got a lot of promise, and will only be getting better as the code gets massaged.

My first reaction to Flock was “holy crap!” – after using it for awhile, I’m still very impressed, but also a little surprised. I’d thought that the tighter integration to my blog, del.icio.us and Flickr accounts would have totally changed the way I worked with those tools. I suppose there is still the potential for that, but there isn’t really anything that I couldn’t replicate in other browsers using some decent bookmarklets. My del.icio.us account is already one click away on any browser I use (for adding, querying and viewing), as is my blog (again, for all CRUD tasks), Flickr, and lots of other handy tools. And my current blog posting utility (using the popup window in any browser) doesn’t give me the crappy-HTML-code-generation problems, or disappearing-post problems that Flock’s built in editor appears to suffer from.

After stepping back a bit, I realized that part of what was impressing me so much about Flock was the Firefox core beneath the custom code. The extensions I’d added are pretty sweet (GreaseMonkey, the Web Developer Toolbar, etc…) and already available for Firefox. And “stock” Firefox doesn’t have some of the perceived performance problems I’m having with Flock (some of which are, I’m sure, due to the synchronization with del.icio.us).

So, after saying I’d give Flock some time to try it out, I waffle on that, and am moving straight to Firefox for a week or so. I’ll be keeping my eye on Flock though – it’s got a lot of promise, and will only be getting better as the code gets massaged.

Testing Flock

So, Flock looks cool. A custom build of Firefox, with direct tie-ins to social stuff like del.icio.us and weblog posting. Has a handy blog manager built in, like a MarsEdit Lite. This could be one handy tool… It’s pegging my CPU right now, so I’m not going to play with it as much as I’d like…

Technorati Tags: ,

Interesting… It actually embeds the Technorati Tags into the post. And adds in the

elements. That’s a pain, since I have WP set to auto-create them…

I noticed that the Flock blog editor also had an option to display a Flickr toolbar. That’s interesting. I didn’t get a chance to play with that, since I had to force quit Flock to get my Powerbook’s CPU back. I’ll give ‘er a shot tomorrow.

Update: an actual writeup on Flock at The Savvy Technologist.

Update: Wait – it uses my del.icio.us account to store all bookmarks/favorites? That’s bloody brilliant! No local bookmarks! It’s currently chewing through my collection of bookmarks on del.icio.us and bringing them into the Flock management interface. Very cool.

So, Flock looks cool. A custom build of Firefox, with direct tie-ins to social stuff like del.icio.us and weblog posting. Has a handy blog manager built in, like a MarsEdit Lite. This could be one handy tool… It’s pegging my CPU right now, so I’m not going to play with it as much as I’d like…

Technorati Tags: ,

Interesting… It actually embeds the Technorati Tags into the post. And adds in the

elements. That’s a pain, since I have WP set to auto-create them…

I noticed that the Flock blog editor also had an option to display a Flickr toolbar. That’s interesting. I didn’t get a chance to play with that, since I had to force quit Flock to get my Powerbook’s CPU back. I’ll give ‘er a shot tomorrow.

Update: an actual writeup on Flock at The Savvy Technologist.

Update: Wait – it uses my del.icio.us account to store all bookmarks/favorites? That’s bloody brilliant! No local bookmarks! It’s currently chewing through my collection of bookmarks on del.icio.us and bringing them into the Flock management interface. Very cool.